17. Books and movies addict. Reading through this account is reading through my mind.

22nd April 2014

Photo reblogged from Explore with 694 notes

explore-blog:

Brilliant: Dinah Fried cooks and photographs meals from beloved books — Moby-Dick (above), Little Women, The Catcher in the Rye, Lolita, and more:

Reading and eating are natural companions, and they’ve got a lot in common. Reading is consumption. Eating is consumption. Both are comforting, nourishing, restorative, relaxing, and mostly enjoyable. They can energize you or put you to sleep. Heavy books and heavy meals both require a period of intense digestion. Just as reading great novels can transport you to another time and place, meals — good and bad ones alike — can conjure scenes very far away from your kitchen table. Some of my favorite meals convey stories of origin and tradition; as a voracious reader, I devour my favorite books.

See more here.

explore-blog:

Brilliant: Dinah Fried cooks and photographs meals from beloved booksMoby-Dick (above), Little Women, The Catcher in the Rye, Lolita, and more:

Reading and eating are natural companions, and they’ve got a lot in common. Reading is consumption. Eating is consumption. Both are comforting, nourishing, restorative, relaxing, and mostly enjoyable. They can energize you or put you to sleep. Heavy books and heavy meals both require a period of intense digestion. Just as reading great novels can transport you to another time and place, meals — good and bad ones alike — can conjure scenes very far away from your kitchen table. Some of my favorite meals convey stories of origin and tradition; as a voracious reader, I devour my favorite books.

See more here.

22nd April 2014

Quote reblogged from Explore with 588 notes

Our modern conception of human excellence is too often impoverished, cold, and bloodless. Success does not always come from thinking more rigorously or striving harder.
Trying Not To Try – fantastic read on the paradoxical art of serendipity and how to master it using the Chinese concept of wu-wei. (via explore-blog)

22nd April 2014

Quote reblogged from Explore with 2,179 notes

Try not to compromise. So many people don’t do what they really want in their hearts because they feel like they’re not good enough, or they’re not smart enough, or they’re not talented enough… anything. And that doesn’t matter. In order for you to live a remarkable life — in order for you to live a life that is fulfilling — you need to be able to go after what you want. And if you don’t, you’re not going to achieve it — ever.
— On Humble Pied, Debbie Millman shares three pieces of wisdom to guide the way to a remarkable life. Dive deeper with her timelessly wonderful illustrated-essay-turned-commencement-address on courage and the creative life. (via explore-blog)

16th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Hey Funniest Post! with 101,868 notes

Source: theghostofgracekellly

16th April 2014

Post reblogged from Hey Funniest Post! with 13,729 notes

cthonical:

kingcheddarxvii:

*pulls out phone* “hey check out this meme”

"woah, don’t you know liking memes isn’t cool???"

"aha it’s a metaphor. i like the meme but i never press the reblog button. put it in your likes but never give it the power to ruin your blog"

this fault in your stars meme is cracking me up so hard

Source: kingcheddarxvii

16th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Explore with 363 notes

explore-blog:

A rare and wonderful interview with legendary, reclusive artist Agnes Martin 

explore-blog:

A rare and wonderful interview with legendary, reclusive artist Agnes Martin 

15th April 2014

Quote reblogged from Explore with 551 notes

A wise person knows when and how to make the exception to every rule… A wise person knows how to improvise… Real-world problems are often ambiguous and ill-defined and the context is always changing. A wise person is like a jazz musician — using the notes on the page, but dancing around them, inventing combinations that are appropriate for the situation and the people at hand. A wise person knows how to use these moral skills in the service of the right aims. To serve other people, not to manipulate other people. And finally, perhaps most important, a wise person is made, not born. Wisdom depends on experience, and not just any experience. You need the time to get to know the people that you’re serving. You need permission to be allowed to improvise, try new things, occasionally to fail and to learn from your failures. And you need to be mentored by wise teachers.

Legendary psychologist Barry Schwartz, author of the enormously stimulating Practical Wisdom: The Right Way to Do the Right Thing, on our loss of wisdom

(via swissmiss)

15th April 2014

Quote reblogged from Explore with 616 notes

A free public library is a revolutionary notion, and when people don’t have free access to books, then communities are like radios without batteries. You cut people off from essential sources of information — mythical, practical, linguistic, political — and you break them. You render them helpless in the face of political oppression.
— The wise and wonderful Anne Lamott, who turns 60 today, in Robert Dawson’s altogether fantastic photographic love letter to libraries.  (via explore-blog)

15th April 2014

Quote reblogged from Explore with 274 notes

Lucid dream [is] a phenomenon in which the dreamer becomes aware they are dreaming and can potentially control their actions as well as the content and context of the dream. Lucid dreams are generally understood to occur exclusively during REM, the final phase of the sleep cycle that is most closely related to wakefulness and the one generally associated with dreams. Research on the prevalence of lucid dreamers suggests that if you’ve never had a lucid dream, you may be in the minority.

[…]

[Studies indicate] that practicing a physical activity during a lucid dream could improve performance in waking life.

[…]

The strategy laid out for actively training yourself to lucid dream [in the] 1991 book, Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming … boils down to are identifying discrepancies from reality that can help you realize you are dreaming and, hopefully, gain conscious control of your dream. The first step, therefore, is to spend a few weeks recording your dreams and identifying these themes.

The Atlantic's Tiffanie Wen explores the latest research on lucid dreaming. Pair with this animated explainer of how it works, then dive deeper with Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming. (via explore-blog)

15th April 2014

Quote reblogged from Explore with 182 notes

Find the general things that appeal to other people, find the universals to what’s important about your science that can communicate and be understood by people in other fields and other walks of life, and find the universals in your passion. You have a passion for what you do — try to explain why you feel that passion. And if you’re able to link those universals of discovery and passion with the facts of science, you’ve done very well.

Fantastic advice on how to mater the art of science communication from Neil Shubin, author of the bestselling Your Inner Fish: A Journey into the 3.5-Billion-Year History of the Human Body and host of PBS’s new show based on the book.

Complement with another Neil-named master of science communication – deGrasse Tyson – on the art of the soundbite

(via explore-blog)